How to denote verses of a poem in running text?

I need to fit a certain amount of text onto one double page of a print document. The text has several poems in it which of course have verses. But because it would take up too much space I can’t use line breaks to signify the end of a verse.
Is there a common character used for denoting the end of a verse or something else I can do to show where the verses end?

Answer

Yes, the slash is used between running lines of poetry or song lyrics. You can capitalize according to grammar or at the beginning of each line, as you prefer:

Song lyrics:

There comes a time/when you heed a certain call/and the world must come together as one/There are people dying,/oh and it’s time to lend a hand to life — /the greatest gift of all

We are the world/We are the children/We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let’s start giving/There’s a choice we’re makin’,/We’re savin’ our own lives/It’s true we make a brighter day, just you and me

Poetry:

How can my muse want subject to invent/While thou dost breathe, that pour’st into my verse/Thine own sweet argument, too excellent/For every vulgar paper to rehearse?/O, give thyself the thanks if aught in me/Worthy perusal stand against thy sight,/For who’s so dumb that cannot write to thee,/When thou thyself dost give invention light?/Be thou the tenth Muse, ten times more in worth/Than those old nine which rhymers invocate,/And he that calls on thee, let him bring forth/Eternal numbers to outlive long date./If my slight muse do please these curious days,/The pain be mine, but thine shall be the praise.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : Lukeception , Answer Author : Community

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