What are the best tools for testing how a website will look on different platforms and what are their pros and cons?

What are the best tools for testing how a website will look on different platforms and what are their pros and cons?

This includes knowing how my layout/fonts display and functionality in various browsers and OS, not merely how the layout adapts to different device sizes.

Answer

The best tools for testing how a website will look on different platforms are actually using the different platforms themselves. That means owning all the devices and using all of the relevant operating systems and browsers that your users will use. The pros are that every option is tested (if done correctly). The cons are that it can be relatively expensive to buy all of the devices and takes a lot of time to test.

But doing so for every device/software combination is relatively unrealistic. I encourage you and your company to do it as much as you can, especially hitting the primary user’s devices and software. As such, here’s how I test websites/web apps:

  • For some testing (especially testing responsiveness and page load/render) I use Chrome’s dev tools. These are great tools and the ones I’m most comfortable using. Their dev tools are also a great assistance in development, but that’s off topic.

  • While developing, I regularly test the website in different browsers and devices that I have when new “pieces” of the website are done. A “piece” could be a finished theme, a new animation set, a new interactive element, etc. This makes it so that you actually complete the piece including testing and any iteration that follows before you say you’re done. Keep in mind load time and performance when doing this as well.

  • I love doing user tests with my friends and whoever else is around (essentially letting them use your site/app while you watch and then asking them relevant but somewhat general questions afterwards about it), especially if they’re potential users. This is good to do in the prototyping/early stages as well as the later ones to make sure you’re not investing a bunch of time in something useless.

  • Once everything is more or less “done”, I sometimes test my site using a validation service and occosionally similar tools, but it’s not on the top of my “this must be done every time” list.

There are other applications/tools that do automated testing which can be useful, but personally I haven’t worked on something massive enough to require it and you get more accurate results by testing on the different devices and platforms themselves, so I haven’t ever used any much.

Attribution
Source : Link , Question Author : curious , Answer Author : Zach Saucier

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